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Desiring and turning away

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Derrida disagrees with Heidegger's summation that the measure of a Philosopher's life is that he was born, he thought, and he dies. But in an interview admits, that in heidegger's words, he finds something oddly familiar. He is only prepared to give his interviewers the mere 'facts' about the way he met his wife Marguerite.

Elsewhere, he argues that one revolts against the bizarre, but there are times that one accepts the bizarre.

At the root of this contradiction, of turning away and desiring, is writing, not writing as we know it, taking pen to paper, but a primordial writing, an articulation, of stamping an impression, in order to leave a trace, to marry a heideggerian and Derridean motif in one fell swoop. It is the writing of one's presence, a desiring to be and a interest in be-longing.

I will continue this later.


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I remember Derrida saying something about the writer always being earnest, insofar as even when he is lying or joking he nevertheless intends you to believe in and trust him. I think it's interesting to relate this to the statement "no one cares" when one person tries to mock another's earnestness. Not sure if this has much to do with where you're taking the entry, though.

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HH, thanks for that. I am more concerned about the ontological act of writing. An 'Act of Literature', so to speak, the need to express and yet the need to shy away from saying too much. Derrida talks about his in a documentary I watched .(http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7347615341871798222&ei=SnsXSdbgH6eKqQPw3NjpDQ&q=Derrida) I am interested in this idea, because I too seem to fluctuate between not wanting to say and needing to articulate something. Somewhere in this to-ing and fro-ing is, Derrida seems to imply, Being. But I am also fascinated by the Blogging phenomenon, and how it is situated with writing as a whole.

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