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Amirsan

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About Amirsan

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Amirsan's Activity

  1. Amirsan added a post in a topic The Importance of Neuroscience in the Classroom   

    Yeah, there are alot of grammar errors and awkward phrases, please don't mind themn.


    I'm not really sure what you mean by imaginative stuff in the nueroscience for kids section, Listener. I think that's because I haven't provided the actual citation , here is the website I was referring to: http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html

    As for the distiction of neuroscience, I say it is better than Psychology. Psychology I believe is too broad for what I am talking about, and it covers topics which would be of little benefit as a foundation for learning. Typical psychology courses in high school also need to be watered down because of the broad field. However, neuroscience some may say is a bit too focused. Therefore, a better term I believe to call the content and focus of this class would be Cognitive Neuroscience, which is a blend between Cognitive Psychology and Nueroscience and Nuerobiology.

    I believe the idea of learning the neuroscience is to see simply HOW your brain works, and how does that translate to the every day things you do when thinking and learning, and committing things to memory.

    Angakuk, how can you be confident that your methods are learning are the most ideal methods? About the teaching aspect, although I believe neuroscience would greatly aid teachers in their methods, I believe the idea of my essay is for students to learn how to teach themselves. They should learn how their brain works, how to use it, and how, without teachers, they can teach themselves what they need to learn.

    I will get some more detailed replies soon.
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  2. Amirsan added a post in a topic The Importance of Neuroscience in the Classroom   

    Anyone have an opinion on the topic?
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  3. Amirsan added a post in a topic Supporting the site   


    Couldn't disagree, really.
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  4. Amirsan added a post in a topic Supporting the site   

    Oops yes, I did misread.

    In that case maybe we could try focusing on one specific charity or cause, and make it known that this is the cause that the website is supporting. That may possibly make people more willing to donate also. Ofcourse, you should probably consider putting a small link or image on the actual forum.

    Maybe a sort of contest where people would donate to enter the contest, and also whatever the contest is, would also provide more content. For example, if its a story contest, like best story, there would be the stories which would provide great reads for the forum, and also the submissions would be going towards donations and charities.

    Note, contests also would possibly attract more visitors from other philosophy related sites, if you can get those sites to post news about your contest.

    Just some random ideas.
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  5. Amirsan added a post in a topic Supporting the site   

    Hmm, well if you really need the money in order to keep the site up, I doubt donations and charities would provide you a consistent foundation. I would recommend putting up ads, and using it just to support the site hosting, and not for profit if that is how you like it. Google ads aren't pretty but they work, and they can definitely help keep the site supported at a very little expense of the average user and reader - I really doubt any visitor would be offended at all. After all, how else can the site stay online?

    You could also consider more aggressive ways of making the forums more popular in general, through search engines, trading links with other philosophy forums and websites, etc. There are countless techniques to market the website and get a greater stream of visitors, readers and members, thus expanding the philosophical community.
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  6. Amirsan added a post in a topic "Nature vs Nurture"   

    But why not Rusty? I may agree that people do have different physical structures, and physical appearances (for example, obviously not everyone can be a world-class model) but I don't think the same applies to other standards, even like art, or music, or intellectual abilities.

    Sometimes we tend to look at geniuses in all vocations and believe that they were born with the ability, or hard-wire to become what they are. Unfortunately, we seem to overlook the hours upon hours they committed to perfecting their craft, MANY more hours than the average person.

    Does this conclusion imply that because we believe we aren't hardwired to learn multi-variable calculus, we shouldn't dedicate all our effort to trying to? Unfortunately, because most people have ingrained doubts from their 3rd grade class that they can't get their multiplication tables, they never put their effort in learning math, and once they get to high school or college, its obvious that they won't be able to do multi-variable calculus. But who is to say that their troubles in 3rd grade was not because of their ability, but because of bad teaching?

    I also am not sure how genes can be quantified into arbitrary standards of success. The "genius artist" is a human-created standard. Is it possible that we are underestimating the potential of humans by setting possibly low standards? What if a genius can become an even greater genius? And most average people become a the former genius?

    I would also appreciate if someone can reconcile the very influential discoveries of neuroplasticity with the "nature" side of the debate. If neuroplasticity states that our brains have the ability to change through all ages, can't it be said that "bad artists" be changed to "good artists," or bad public speakers to good public speakers, through effortful practice and proper methods?
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  7. Amirsan added a topic in Explore   

    "Nature vs Nurture"
    I am sure many of you have heard this phrase, in reference to the big debate of whether it is genes or environment which shape human behavior. I am curious, what is your take on this debate? What is your side, if you stand on one side or the other. Also, what implications do you think this has for philosophy?

    I am personally disposed to the idea that every human being, unless born with extreme deformities such as severe depression, or autism, was born with equal potential to achieve whatever they wish. And ofcourse, there are those who believe that humans, instead are born with unequal and limited capabilities based on their genetic makeup.

    I am personally very interested in this debate, and lately I have been reading articles from several writers (such as Steven Pinker) and scientists with different opinions. I am curious what are your conclusions to this issue.
    • 7 replies
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  8. Amirsan added a post in a topic The Importance of Neuroscience in the Classroom   

    Sure I just uploaded it, here is the link to the HTML version:
    http://www.stratcommandcenter.com/amir/tasp/Special%20Issue.html
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  9. Amirsan added a topic in Explore   

    The Importance of Neuroscience in the Classroom
    Here is an essay I recently wrote on the importance of teaching neuroscience in public schooling. Please read it, and discuss! This thread is not so much for critiquing my writing as it is to debate and discuss the topic itself, within the context of this essay.

    However, if you feel there can be any improvements made to the essay itself, please feel free to post it. The essay itself is not too great in terms of style-- it may seem very redundant with many grammar errors, so I plan to iron it out sooner or later.

    Anyways, here is the link to download the essay:
    http://www.stratcommandcenter.com/amir/tasp/Special%20Issue.doc

    Please, attack it, debate it, agree with it, anything! I'd love to to get a discussion started with someone who disagrees totally with what I said (or partially).
    • 8 replies
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  10. Amirsan added an answer to a question Your very first serious philosophy reading   

    Well, its been a year since I've read the Prince and the Art of War. So I'd have to read it again before I make an in depth critique. That's a good idea though! I should write how I feel, what I think..

    Though, I know this may be going a bit farther then I should.. but how do you go beyond that? Like farther than just writing your feelings to actually making an argument from the text?

    How was your first experience?
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  11. Amirsan added a post in a topic Mental illness   

    I think it is that genius simply comes from mentally ill people only because they, more than most, passionately search their surroundings for stimuli that would help relieve their condition. This susceptibility to incoming stimuli in the environment, due to their desire to relieve their melancholy or condition, enhances their creativity.

    However, the stimuli that the person gets can vary, which is why it is siad that there are the mentally depressed that become geniuses and those who become "bums" or unsuccessful. The reason is most likely because of the type of stimuli and environment: a mentally depressed teenager may find a cure to his problem in drugs, if his environment is filled with that influence. On the other hand, a mentally depressed teenager in another environment can seek refuge in drawing or books.
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  12. Amirsan added a question in Help   

    Your very first serious philosophy reading
    What was the very first serious work you have read in philosophy? What were the circumstances of you reading it? How did you do?

    I guess mine would be the Prince, but it wasn't a serious read. If you consider Sun Tzu's Art of War philosophy then that would be my first a few years ago.

    Anyways, I am interested in doing some serious reading and I am looking for some direction.
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  13. Amirsan added an answer to a question Writing an essay for a college application   



    Woow. That's funny. lol But really, I won't deny the fact that I need to look at a college app essay. I am really unsure how they are supposed to look. I am pretty sure it is different than the "5 paragraph essay formula" we are choked with from 3rd grade.
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  14. Amirsan added an answer to a question Writing an essay for a college application   

    haha!



    Though seriously, it's not as easy as thought, especially when we've been trained for years with the "five paragraph formula".
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  15. Amirsan added an answer to a question Writing an essay for a college application   

    TheBeast, do you think you can send me some of those essays? I've been wanting to see how good college essays look like. Like Oneiromancy, I am unsure how they are supposed to be like (like what form, etc... obviously different from a newspaper article or a novel).
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