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Learn Spanish

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Posted

I'm just practising some pronunciation exercises. Apparently 'r' in Spanish is either rolled or sounds more like dd than the english 'r'.

However, when they say it in the audio files, I'm hearing a sound that sounds a lot like an english 'r'. Can anyone explain the Spanish pronunciation of 'r' when it isn't rolled?

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Posted

I speak a little German, but I understand not. Literally.

It's ein bi

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Posted

well, if you don't have the symbol for it, you can spell it phonetically, id est ss

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Posted

May I point out that grammatical or spelling errors in either the Spanish or the German phrase are totally irrelevant. If I could speak either language with any sort of fluency, I would not have needed to use the phrase. In fact, the errors themselves help to emphasize my lack of fluency, thus garnering just the sort of consideration and patience they were meant to engender.

Angakuk (partially illiterate in 5 languages, completely illiterate in all the others)

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Posted

But to study a language is to learn from mistakes, Angakuk. Your mistakes help other beginners learn, too. Please don't be afraid of making helpful mistakes. :cheers1:

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Posted

I'm not afraid of making mistakes. I make mistakes all the time. In fact, I have made some mistakes so often they have practically become standard practice. Thus are innovations born.

Angakuk

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Posted

Lesson II:

Qualia

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Posted

Can anyone explain to me why 'tener' conjugates differently to 'comer'? Is 'tener' an exception to the rule?

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Posted

Tener is one of many irregular verbs. Like English, Spanish has loads.

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Posted

Ah, that explains it.

So, is there any easy way to spot an irregular verb before conjugating it?

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Posted

No :D Stick to my lesson plan. By the end of these two lessons and the little thing at the beginning of this thread you will be able to count to ten, identify yourself and others, designate where you are in the house, offer ideas of possession, know some general vocabulary and how to say 'blow-job' in Spanish. That's not bad, for a couple of hours work and all for free. I'd be charging the suit boys

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Posted

OK, I'm just going to try and put a few basic sentences together.

Vosotras chicas comeis uvas - You girls are eating grapes

Comenos naranjas - You are eating oranges

Usted habla espanol?

Si, hablo espanol.

Ellos hablan ingles?

No, yo hablo ingles y ellos hablan espanol.

Edit - Missed the second 'o' on 'naranjas'

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Posted

OK. You got to be careful.

Vosotras chicas comeis uvas - You girls are eating grapes

When? By using the present simple you are giving the idea of permanency. Like, 'my name is qualia,' 'my car is green.' If the girls are eating graps now, then the correct form is: "est

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Posted

OK, so I guess I need to learn to distinguish between different forms of the present tense. :(

For 'You are eating oranges' I was using 'You' in the formal sense.

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Posted

BTW, For 'simple conjunction' in lesson 2, don't you mean 'simple disjunction'?

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Posted

For 'You are eating oranges' I was using 'You' in the formal sense.

OK, There's two ways of doing this:

1) Come naranjas = singular

2) Comen naranjas =plural

If the subject pronoun is needed because it's not clear who one is talking to, then slip in an 'usted' or 'ustedes'. That is:

1) Come usted naranjas.

2) Comen ustedes naranjas.

Usted may be written in grammar form as 'a formal you' but that doesn't make a lot of sense because 'you' is the formal form of 'Thou.' The English talk to everyone in 'usted,' even to those they are making love to!

Speaking of tenses (tiempos (times) en castellano)

There is no absolute distinction between present simple and present continuous in Spanish.

In English we say "I eat oranges" which is a habit and "I am eating oranges" which is an activity occuring at this moment. In Spanish, 'como naranjas' can be either of the two; however, 'estoy comiendo naranjas' stresses the fact or case.

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Posted

So now we're bringing in syntax as well, eh?

OK, so

Verb - pronoun - object

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Posted

Ah sorry. No, don't follow that rule! I just put it in because you can do it with usted (but not the others, just to confuse you hahahaha)

Come usted manzanas: you eat apples/you are eating apples

Usted come manzanas: you eat apples/you are eating apples

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Posted

So, if asking a question, is the pronoun still not required?

E.g. Come manzanas?

ETA - Hang on...is there a typo in your post, or is there a reason why you switched from an -e ending to an -es ending?

Wait....the -es ending is an informal address, yes?

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Posted

Yes :D

OK. Beast. Try to drop the subject pronouns whenever possible (except in usted). Otherwise, later, you're not going to be able to drop them because they'll be too drummed in your head! Obviously, they are used but not anything to the extent we use them in English. It took me a long time to realise that, which is why I pass this into you. I came to Spain with no knowledge of Spanish and just had to get by on wit and charm for a good many years. I made (and still do) mistakes which is why I try to pass on my best to you.

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Posted

BTW, how does one pronounce 'frances' (I can't get accents here)?

Is it fran + sez

or

fran + thes

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Posted

In spain: 'fran-thes' You naughty boy! 2 sylables. Stress the bold.

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Posted

Test:

fr

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Posted

Just a quick question for you, Qualia (or for anyone else who knows the answer):

A few posts ago you stated that "espa

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Posted

Just curious - sorry if it comes across as a little picky.

Hey Sothisismike, it's an extremely valid question! and I'm glad you have been thoughtful enough to post it.

How clear-cut is that distinction? I mean, can't "castellano" be used as an adjective to denote that something has the property of being of Castillian origin? Couldn't a certain dish, person, or type of art be Castiallian, as opposed to Andalusian?

Yes, it can. You're absolutely right.

Furthermore, isn't Castellano just the prevalent dialect of the Spanish language? Do those in Mexico and South America speak it, or can they properly be said to speak espa

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Posted

OK, I've got what I need from Unit 1 of studyspanish.com typed up, so I'm going to spend a week or two learning that before I move on.

I'm also going to try to work through Qualia's work here, as much as I can.

You know, I have a better use for this Spanish.

You know when you go in a bar and the girl wants to talk. A few words in Spanish, pretend you don't know a word of english, and the convo should be over very quickly. (Either that or she'll drone on and on and on and on and on)

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