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Movies i've seen...

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Posted

Here's a scene from a film adaptation of a play by Samuel Beckett. Not a movie I've seen, but I've seen the scene, so here's the scene that I've seen from the movie I haven't seen.

Given the existence as uttered forth in the public search engines of Google and Bing of a publicly accessible video quaquaquaqua outside concrete reality without apparent reason which from the depths of electronic space electronic matter electronic community is loved dearly but by some exceptions for reasons unknown but time will tell but is doomed to suffer like the generic forum with those who for reasons unknown would troll the internetz and would plunge the video in torment plunge it in fire whose fire flames the flag which would if allowed to continue and who could doubt that it ultimately eradicate the upload that is to say blast the viewed from the viewer so that nothing remains besides the knowledge that had the video been observed before the firmament was flamed the impossibility of observance would have been without doubt though some may deny it as illusory imponderable and baseless in the past as the observed will be in the future should for reasons unknown though time will tell the aforementioned individuals decide though they may call it fate which is the result of a lack of free will the existence of which though some may deny for reasons unknown is contested and allowing the possibility of the observer wasting away shrinking away decaying away before said has a chance to view the video which is not entirely impossible although the possibility is so slim as to seem as such it would seem that the viewer wishing to view the video in its totality has it in their best interest to forgo various activities of leisure including running walking swimming dancing skipping singing dancing kicking jumping throwing striking grappling and forgo various activities which arise from a seemingly perpetual state of monotony tedium or boredom lest the viewer begins to view the video and due to the fire that flames the flag or the mortality that leaves us as dust before we can conclude our exploits our musings and our duties it is left unfinished.

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Posted

I saw The Watchmen movie.

I posted this on pajiba.com a few months ago:

I didn't walk into the movie theater expecting some light action movie like Iron Man, or some grand crime saga like The Dark Knight. I had read the graphic novel, and hoped that Snyder wouldn't fumble the ball, irrespective of how the film looked in the trailers. But alas, the movie completely blew it.

First of all, the graphic novel was a satire. That is why it was revolutionary and mind-blowing. Yet, Snyder took the material seriously, and ended up making the very story that Alan Moore satirized. Snyder lacked the proper depth and understanding of the material to handle its subtlety correctly. At times, the film gets the graphic novel just right... but only sometimes. The minute the Comedian is murdered, you knew Snyder fumbled the ball. The choreography was excellent, but the sound effects were essentially Saturday Morning cartoon quality.

Alan Moore had the advantage of writing in 1986 where the majority of comics were cheesy filler mainly addressed to children, and he wrote an ultra-realistic and gritty version of the superheroes for us adults. In his version history is dramatically different, because there's NO way such superheroes could exist in the USA and not impact our history. Moreover, in order to be a superhero, you couldn't be an average joe mentally wise. You have to have a litany of psychological tweaks.

Snyder's background is in flashy car commercials. This reeks in every single of his films. I went in hoping for at least Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven, a satire of the western genre, and walked out with a bad flashback to the campy Batman show from the 1960s.

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I have been on a David Lynch kick of late.

I recently rewatched Blue Velvet; it is even better than I remembered. There seems to be a theme running through Lynch's works: that of redemption. It must be remembered that Jeffery's hands do not remain clean in the film. He is a compelling protagonist, in a way, a kind of heroic anti-hero; he struggles with coming to grips with the existence of Frank (why are there people like Frank? Why is there so much trouble in this world, he asks), while "Frank" manifests himself in Jeffery when the masochism of Dorothy Vallens brings out Jeffery's latent sadism. "Hit me!" she begs of him, and while he at first resists, he ultimately strikes her in the mouth several times. In a powerful scene, we later see Jeffery remembering his own sadism, coupled with his horror and disgust at Frank, crying alone in a room, remorseful and guilty.

It seems apparent that Lynch, via this dark and at times thoroughly surrealistic film, is attempting to communicate to us that love is, or can be, both the cause (Lynch reminds us that Frank is a man "very much in love") and the cure for suffering and violence, both responsible for the Fall and the condition for redemption.

It is a powerful film. It's intense emotive nature was, as in the case of Roger Ebert, cause for criticism, as I believe, it takes one down dark roads, often self reflective in nature, that many are unwilling to travel.

I viewed another Lynch film last night, Wild at Heart. It is an interesting feature of human persons that person A can look at thing X and person B can look at thing X, each coming to radically different conclusions. Such is definitely the case as regards this film: on initial screenings, it provoked both wild cheers from the audience and deafening boos. The film is not without what I personally hold to be valid criticisms; at times the actual characters are so utterly divorced from reality that there is no horizon in which to meet them. It is a moral film. The ending seems to point us to the "possible worlds" nature of ethical discourse. I believe the film asks us a question about the affirmation of the positive things that life, as it is experienced by we human entities, has to proffer us: are we willing to affirm the negations? I am reminded of a character from Gravity's Rainbow, who asks if life could be thunder and lightning, but kind thunder and lightning. The search for love, for excitement, for desire fulfillment, the longing for new wines, as yet untasted, comes with a price! Suffering, torture, pain, loneliness, etc. Can or should we pay the price?

I also recently rewatched Mulholland Drive. Still confused.

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Posted

I highly recommend the movie Beasts of the Southern Wild. Here are a couple of trailers for your enjoyment.

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Posted (edited)

I highly recommend the movie Beasts of the Southern Wild. Here are a couple of trailers for your enjoyment.

Looks interesting... but the pedant in me wants to say that aurochs were cattle, not pigs.

Edited by Peter

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Posted

I highly recommend the movie Beasts of the Southern Wild. Here are a couple of trailers for your enjoyment.

Looks interesting... but the pedant in me wants to say that aurochs were cattle, not pigs.

That leaves you to account for the lesson about the aurochs:

Beasts of the Southern Wild... a fierce, mean creature that walked the face of the earth back when we all lived in the caves. And they would gobble them cavebabies down right in front of the cavebaby parents. And the cavemans - they couldn't even do nothin' about it, 'cause they was too poor and too small.

Man-eating pigs? Sure. Man-eating cows? Nah. HehHeh.

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Posted (edited)

Another Earth.

Touted along the lines of Primer, a low budget but high IQ scifi, it was rather interesting.

The scifi premise hung like a dark shadow over everything, and the plot proceeded quite briskly to a surprising conclusion. The cast was all kinds of wonderful, and the setting in a dreary small town lent a consistent atmosphere. The sfx was rather seamless, despite the low budget tagline.

B+

Source Code

A more classic hollywood action flick, but with an interesting scifi premise (quantum mechanics). Jake Gyllenhaal is always good, regardless of the film, and the rest of the cast was solid. While the plot was more formulaic, and the ending straight out of Hollywood 100, the film was pleasant, if somewhat forgettable. Much better than your average scifi cash grab like Jumper or Limitless.

B-

Edited by The Heretic

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Posted

Last night we saw Zero Dark Thirty. All there really is to say about it is that I would recommend Argo.

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Posted

Recently saw The Revenant. If I could do it all over again, I wouldn't bother. Nice scenery, well photographed, but that's about it.

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Posted

Saw 13 Hours. Very entertaining and, in that way at least, superior to The Revenant. Did not find 13 Hours to be a political hatchet job. The utter chaos depicted in the movie was fantastic. Glad to have seen this movie.

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Posted

Perhaps this thread should be revived. Here are the films I've seen over the last 12 months:


Birdman 9.5
Kingsman 8.0
Ex-Machina 9.0
Chappie 7.0
Avengers Age of Ultron 8.0
Mad Max Fury Road 9.0
Ant Man 7.5
Jurrasic World 8.0
Inside Out 8.5
Mission Impossible Rogue Nation 8.5
The Martian 9.0
Tomorrowland 6.5
Terminator Genysis 6.5
American Sniper 6.0
Man from UNCLE 6.5
American Ultra 6.0
Focus 7.0
Maleficent 6.0
Exodus Gods and Kings 6.0

Star Wars TFA: 7.5
 

:trollfro: 

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Posted

I completely agree about Birdman. I think you've over-rated American Sniper. I really really disliked that movie.

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I subtracted 5 from your numbers assuming you were doing 1 out of 10, now they make more sense. ;)

Although how you could rate Chappie above a 0 is beyond me!

Birdman 4.5
Kingsman 3.0
Ex-Machina 4.0
Chappie 2.0
Avengers Age of Ultron 3.0
Mad Max Fury Road 4.0
Ant Man 2.5
Jurrasic World 3.0
Inside Out 3.5
Mission Impossible Rogue Nation 3.5
The Martian 4.0
Tomorrowland 1.5
Terminator Genysis 1.5
American Sniper 1.0
Man from UNCLE 1.5
American Ultra 1.0
Focus 2.0
Maleficent 1.0
Exodus Gods and Kings 1.0

Star Wars TFA: 2.5

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Posted

I completely agree about Birdman. I think you've over-rated American Sniper. I really really disliked that movie.

Admittedly, numbers for film is a lazy way of doing reviews, but they denote my overall impressions. To be fair to these films, I should put some more effort in reviewing them - at least the good ones like Interstellar and Birdman

American Sniper was pretty underwhelming, and proof that the insular nature of Hollywood has gotten worse over the years. :whatever: 

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Posted (edited)

I subtracted 5 from your numbers assuming you were doing 1 out of 10, now they make more sense. ;)

Although how you could rate Chappie above a 0 is beyond me!

 

:troll:

I expected nothing less. However. William Gibson was so impressed with Chappie and has been trying to promote it on Twitter like a shameless PR firm:

https://twitter.com/greatdismal/status/573565157688782848

https://twitter.com/greatdismal/status/575383682833240064

https://twitter.com/greatdismal/status/593307561270480896

 

Edited by The Heretic

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Saw Hail, Caesar! last night. It is definitely worth seeing. Even better than the philosophical ramblings of the "study group" that kidnapped George Clooney's character, were the scenes with Channing Tatum and Alden Ehrenreich. Both of them were very good. Tatum's dancing sailors scene was well danced and very funny; Ehrenreich had more scenes, a greater variety of scenes, and they were all well done

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Batman v Superman

I just posted this on the Pajiba review of said film:

Saw the film last night, so here's my official review:

Grew up reading comics, and was pleased by the recent superhero surge, so I came in with moderate expectations, despite the negative word of mouth.
Watched it with my Dad and older sister, also a fan of comics. Within 15 minutes, my Dad got up and left. It was already bad at that point.

The good? Acting was plausible, special effects were decent, the fight scenes itself were rendered properly, but they went a tad bit overboard with the slo-mo effects. Wonder Woman was a nice scene-stealer, and I hope to see her film made by a more competent crew. Yup.

The bad? Sweet Fancy Moses. Znyder is utterly tone deaf. The horribly contrived script.

All in all, WB studios tried way too hard to create something utterly alien to their distinguished competition, Marvel. And in the process, they forgot how to make a decent film.

The sad thing? Znyder regressed to Watchmen levels in his cannibalization of great comic lore (The Dark Knight Returns, Death of Superman).

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I saw BvS too, and while it's not a masterpiece, it's not as bad as some of the reviews make it out to be. I've seen worse Superhero films that have higher ratings, and some of the criticism is, IMO, a bit silly. Granted there is legitimate criticism out there -the dream sequence with the parademons will be lost on most of the audience. Yes, Marvel teased Thanos, but it was a post-credits scene and the audience who didn't know him from the comics have at least been made aware that he's some otherworldly evil who's more powerful than Loki and commanded the Chitauri- but you can't fault a movie, because its interpretation of a character isn't the one you're expecting due to other films you've seen. If Batman kills people, and Superman is more stern than happy most of the time, so what? It doesn't matter if it's not Bale and Reeve. Personally, I liked Batman's brutality, and how close he was coming to the dark side. Suggests an interesting past, which will hopefully be looked into in Suicide Squad.

Jesse Eisenberg - on the one hand, I liked his interpretation of Lex Luthor, in that he's clearly evil, but his genius and resourcefulness means nobody can touch him until the inevitable jail time at the end. OTOH, it was basically Jesse Eisenberg playing himself. I hink he would have done better playing him more serious, confident, and menacing (as he is in some comics and cartoons) at times, particularly when he didn't need the quirky, crazy kid act any more.

The notion that no reason was given for why they're fighting indicates some critics weren't paying attention. 

Introduction of the other JL characters was poorly done. It's obvious DC want to do what Marvel are doing with The Avengers, but they should have given each character their own movie, rather than try to rush ahead to establishing the team to catch up with the studio who've already done 2 team-up movies. 

The Flash warning to Bruce Wayne made sense to me as I'm aware of the source material, and can guess where the series is going, but it will have been lost on most movie goers. TBH, it felt unnecessary and disorientating. 

Batman didn't change his mind, because Superman just happened to know somebody called Martha, and that was kind of cool. He spared Superman, because the latter uttering that name reminded Batman of his own humanity, and made him aware of Superman's humanity. 

The acting and the characters were mainly good, but so much was stuffed into the movie that there weren't enough opportunities for them. By the end, I didn't really feel like I'd got to know the new Batman, or Alfred, or some others, even though I was happy with the glimpses I got.



 

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Captain America Civil War review

Last night, I took a fellow comic book fan to watch it. Although the only available tickets were the 3D showing, we had a great time. The theater was packed with serious film aficionados – something we all need when watching an event film like CACW.

 

My biggest take away from the film: its meticulous attention to detail, and beautiful craftmanship. The conflict was logically reduced to personal matters, and how progressively polarized it became, making us incapable of taking a clear side and hold it doggedly throughout. More importantly, the film easily exceeds the original comic book crossover from 2006, because the writer Mark Millar shoved every character into ultra-alpha males of excess. But the film's nuance refused to allow the easy path of taking sides between accountability and liberty.

 

Camerawork was topnotch, and the story was told through quite imaginative selection of locations. The global feel of the story came through.

 

Best new character: T'Challa. What a motherfucking mofo, what an introduction to a kick ass character. I was familiar with the character, but now, his film shot up the “must see” list. All the returning characters got their moments to shine, nobody got the short shrift. Ant-Man's giant surprise, Spider-Man's return to Steve Dikto roots, so on, and so forth.

 

I'm far more confident in the Russo brothers' handling of the Marvel Cinematic Universe than I was with Joss Whedon, who seemed overwhelmed with Avengers Age of Ultron.

 

SPOILER/FEARLESS PREDICTION:

 

The two teams will not reunite until the end of Avengers Infinity War part 1, when Thanos, fully staffed with the Infinity Gauntlet, wipes out the official team (Iron Man and company), and here comes the cavalry (Captain America & company). The Guardians of Galaxy manage to bring Thor and Hulk back to Earth for Infinity War part 2 for a hoe-down throw-down for all the marbles.

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