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Movies i've seen...

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Hmm....How do I respond to this? Larry David, creator of Seinfeld and the brilliant Curb your Enthusiasm on Brokerback Moutain: NY Times

Cowboys Are My Weakness

By LARRY DAVID

SOMEBODY had to write this, and it might as well be me. I haven't seen "Brokeback Mountain," nor do I have any intention of seeing it. In fact, cowboys would have to lasso me, drag me into the theater and tie me to the seat, and even then I would make every effort to close my eyes and cover my ears.

And I love gay people. Hey, I've got gay acquaintances. Good acquaintances, who know they can call me anytime if they had my phone number. I'm for gay marriage, gay divorce, gay this and gay that. I just don't want to watch two straight men, alone on the prairie, fall in love and kiss and hug and hold hands and whatnot. That's all.

Is that so terrible? Does that mean I'm homophobic? And if I am, well, then that's too bad. Because you can call me any name you want, but I'm still not going to that movie.

To my surprise, I have some straight friends who've not only seen the movie but liked it. "One of the best love stories ever," one gushed. Another went on, "Oh, my God, you completely forget that it's two men. You in particular will love it."

"Why me?"

"You just will, trust me."

But I don't trust him. If two cowboys, male icons who are 100 percent all-man, can succumb, what chance to do I have, half- to a quarter of a man, depending on whom I'm with at the time? I'm a very susceptible person, easily influenced, a natural-born follower with no sales-resistance. When I walk into a store, clerks wrestle one another trying to get to me first. My wife won't let me watch infomercials because of all the junk I've ordered that's now piled up in the garage. My medicine cabinet is filled with vitamins and bald cures.

So who's to say I won't become enamored with the whole gay business? Let's face it, there is some appeal there. I know I've always gotten along great with men. I never once paced in my room rehearsing what to say before asking a guy if he wanted to go to the movies. And I generally don't pay for men, which of course is their most appealing attribute.

And gay guys always seem like they're having a great time. At the Christmas party I went to, they were the only ones who sang. Boy that looked like fun. I would love to sing, but this weighty, self-conscious heterosexuality I'm saddled with won't permit it.

I just know if I saw that movie, the voice inside my head that delights in torturing me would have a field day. "You like those cowboys, don't you? They're kind of cute. Go ahead, admit it, they're cute. You can't fool me, gay man. Go ahead, stop fighting it. You're gay! You're gay!"

Not that there's anything wrong with it.

Yeah. However immature, I'm along the same lines here. The subject matter is just something I'm not interested in,or make much of a deal of either way. I maybe missing out I guess.

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I hope you're not expecting a response.

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I saw Broken Flowers the other night. An excellent movie about a man who is pushed by his neighbor's curiousity to go find the son he never knew he had, by visiting a number of ex-flames. The movie comes together in the very last scene where we see a man who has completely changed from the first quarter of the movie.

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I saw [url=http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0412019/]Broken Flowers[/url'] the other night. An excellent movie about a man who is pushed by his neighbor's curiousity to go find the son he never knew he had, by visiting a number of ex-flames. The movie comes together in the very last scene where we see a man who has completely changed from the first quarter of the movie.

I saw this the other night also. I liked the soundtrack more than the film( which I have since purchased) but it was good in its own regard. I almost was turned off by some of the slower parts but I understood their purpose. Humorous film and quite clever comedy. The little girl named "Lolita" (all things considered) killed me.

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To all: I sincerely apologize to anyone offended by the Larry David excerpt quoted. I made the mistake of assuming that he was well known enough that people would understand that he's not being totally serious and in fact quite self-deprecating there( and even if he was serious it is in the pathetic sense he does so well on Curb). He does state things the wrong way which is part of his "character" yet I highly doubt David is as serious about his refusal as the quote suggests. He is( I take it) making fun of the of the "weighty hetereosexuality" often associated with homophobia which accounts for the latter half of the quote being totally self-deprecating: he's not enough of a 'man' to see it and he's acknowledging how immature and small of him it is to refuse to see the film on such a basis...

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I thought it was hilarious, BTW. I could just see Larry saying it. Larry does a lot of comedy about worrying about saying the wrong thing at the wrong time, lest he look like a homophobe/racist/misogynist. The episode where Larry is "in good with the lesbians" is great. He inadvertantly congratulates a man when Larry finds out the man's lesbian daughter has started dating a man. All the lesbians who were friendly to him start giving the cold shoulder until he inadvertantly says something stupid again and the lesbian community welcomes him back.

I think there was probably some truth to the first part of the article but the second half was pure Larry David neurotic schtick and very reminiscent of Seinfeld's George when he is worried about whether "it moved" or not.

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I thought it was hilarious, BTW. I could just see Larry saying it. Larry does a lot of comedy about worrying about saying the wrong thing at the wrong time, lest he look like a homophobe/racist/misogynist. The episode where Larry is "in good with the lesbians" is great. He inadvertantly congratulates a man when Larry finds out the man's lesbian daughter has started dating a man. All the lesbians who were friendly to him start giving the cold shoulder until he inadvertantly says something stupid again and the lesbian community welcomes him back.

I think there was probably some truth to the first part of the article but the second half was pure Larry David neurotic schtick and very reminiscent of Seinfeld's George when he is worried about whether "it moved" or not.

I'm with rusty here, Seinfeld is an all-time classic, and once Larry David left, the show took a nosedive in quality. I also remember the episode where George and Jerry were talking over a phone, a gift from Kramer, but it was defective because people on the other line could hear everything what they were saying. And that led to a news reporter (?) overhearing them joking around as if they were flagrant homosexuals.

I guess we fooled her. :lol:

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I feel so odd, I must be the only person who never even cracked much of a smile with Seinfeld. Then again, I don't like many sitcoms anymore. Seems the only thing funny is people lying, cheating, whining or stealing something to make a situation to run off of, I find that boring.

-Scott

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I feel so odd, I must be the only person who never even cracked much of a smile with Seinfeld. Then again, I don't like many sitcoms anymore. Seems the only thing funny is people lying, cheating, whining or stealing something to make a situation to run off of, I find that boring.

-Scott

Agreed on all counts. And don't forget the insulting sarcasm that gets passed off as comedy and that gets imitated in real life without regard to the insult.

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Me too, me too! I dislike the vast majority of sitcoms with a passion.

Don't forget the "cute little kid" of about 5 years spouting lines that would get her slapped if she were a few years older, but are somehow "so cuuuuuuute" due to her age. I was never able to suspend my disbelief long enough to forget that the KID wasn't saying them, an ADULT wrote them and put them into her mouth.

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I watched a strange combination of movies tonight. First I watched the documentary Hell House, which is about a church in Texas that puts on a "haunted house" (aka, Hell House) every October. The Hell House consists of short acts that show visitors all the evils of the modern world (sexual abuse, abortion, physical abuse, drugs, guns, etc.) in order to scare the bejebus out of them (or into them?). It apparently attracts over 10,000 visitors every year.

Then I watched The Aristocrats, which has already been mentioned in this thread. That is one foul joke.

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Spanish TV is putting out a lot of independent films at the moment, so the other day they showed Bahman Ghobadi's extraordinary Turtles Can Fly.

This is a truly beautiful film. Its set in Iraqi Kurdistan at the opening of the current U.S-Iraq war and its production team is made up of Iraqis and Iranians.

The film is about children, the of orphaned children of a mountain top. Its a story about one set of children maimed by bombs and bullets, combing the terrain looking for mines and being led by an armless lad who has vivid visions of the future and picks the mines from the soil with his teeth and another group of children trying to set up an enormous TV satelite on top of the same range of hills, so as the adults can see what is happening in their country. This group of children are led by the boy Mr. Satelite.

Given the extreme setting, this film, however, is entirely non-rhetorical. It is not a platform film to make political statements. It is a film of poetry, of beautiful visions, of hope and despair, of great love and pain and lose. It is one of the best films I have witnessed in the last decade. A masterpiece.

Suffice with this quote;

"Turtles Can Fly is...a film of exquisite formal beauty and expressiveness"

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Lord of War. This is a wonderful film about a horrible person. A fascinating insight into the world of gunnrunning seen through the eyes of an amoral gunrunner, Yuri, (played by Nicolas Cage) - obviously, it is suggested that being amoral goes along with the territory. Cage is without a doubt a "lord of war" but the intrigue here is how Yuri thinks and his ability to rationalize his actions affects not only him but his family. One of the film's best moment is how Cage rationalizes the sale of guns he knows will be used to massacre a village right in front of him - minutes after the sale goes down. Overall, a very good fim with good acting by all those involved. I may something else once I let it soak in.

Edit: This film has some great lines and dialogue by the way. Yuri narrates througout the film. In one of the earlier scenes telling us:

I never sold weapons to Osama Bin Laden. Not on any moral grounds. Back then his checks were always bouncing.

Which sums up his character perfectly.

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There's an excellent review of Cach

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Interesting films being commented upon recently. I caught "Downfall" a few months ago and was extremely impressed with Bruno Ganz's performance. The whole idea of them being surrounded in the bunker in the last moments of the war seemed like fiction. It's hard to believe that really happened.

I saw Brokeback Mountain recently. I don't know if it was just the a/c on in the theater, but the scenes set in the high mountains made me freeze. I noted the indoor/outdoor method of shooting the film, probably b/c I'd already heard about that in another review. In one of the last scenes, Heath Ledger is inside, making compromises with his life, and you see the outdoors through a window, almost with the effect of a picture on the wall. I'm kind of sorry I knew about the indoor/outdoor thing, because "noticing" film techniques is annoying to me in general. I like to be transported away by the story, and whenever it comes to consciousness that, "ooh, look at that film technique right there," the experience is lessened for me. I'm not engrossed in it any more, and I become an outsider.

I just saw "Capote" last week, and was incredibly impressed. I'd seen Truman Capote on TV when he was still alive and found him tiresome. I knew he'd written "In Cold Blood," of course, but he seemed to be a pretentious stuffed shirt willing to rest on the laurels of that one achievement. I was never much attracted to "In Cold Blood," partly b/c of my opinion of Capote himself and partly because it seemed such a tawdry subject. It was never a major crime or anything of any importance in itself, not historically significant or anything. I didn't see the movie either. Of course, I was just a kid and wouldn't have been allowed to see it, but it just didn't attract me. Now, suddenly, I'm quite taken with Capote's own story, the story of the "In Cold Blood" story, and his background. In Cold Blood was groundbreaking for being a pioneer of its genre, and Capote was so tied up with that in my mind that I never realized he had written "Breakfast at Tiffany's" and done the screenplay for it. I also never knew before that Harper Lee (To Kill a Mockingbird) was his childhood chum and that one of the characters in her book (Dill) was based on Capote. I never knew what Capote's own background was like, he seemed to me such a privileged person, that I had no idea his own origins were so humble, and indeed oppressive. He had things in common with the killers. I have some inkling now why he may not have ever been able to write anything else. Phillip Seymour Hoffman's portrayal is complex and compelling. You have human sympathy for this person, who nevertheless remains enigmatic. Just what was going on beneath the surface remains alluringly and frustratingly out of sight. Who knows? now I just might read "In Cold Blood." It may tell as much about the author as about its subject.

#65

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I recently saw Victor Erice's beautiful, mesmerising Spirit of the Beehive, and it reminded me of what I had partially forgotten about my childhood: the intense feeling of curiosity, the natural harmony of dreams and reality, and the disturbing perplexity of adult behaviour. There are many magical scenes, but this one is my favourite:

beehive.jpg

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Man, that's a beautiful and disturbing image. Explanation? (Or would it give away too much, for those want to see the movie?)

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ditto. That looks very intriguing.

Here's a movie I haven't seen, . . . YET. "Sophie Scholl"

Has anybody seen it? All I know is what my friend told me (we're going to see it on sunday): It's about three young people in a town who were anti- Nazi, and this is a documentary about their last days before the Nazis rounded them up and killed them (they weren't sent to a concentration camp, apparently, they were just killed). Or something like that.

#118

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Thanks, david. I can't wait to see it.

#118

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Man, that's a beautiful and disturbing image. Explanation? (Or would it give away too much, for those want to see the movie?)

The children are listening for the sound of an approaching train. I won't reveal what happens. :nc:

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Thanks, cragwolf. :)

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Yesterday I watched Dario Argento's well-known horror film, Suspiria. Not even the ridiculously over-the-top soundtrack, absurd violence, banal plot, and poor casting, could ruin this surreal and stylised work. A masterpiece it is not, but what an imagination this Italian film maestro reveals to us, deranged and dazzling in equal measure. Seldom have I witnessed more ingenious and creative ways to murder women. Rarely have I seen such outlandish and seductive interiors in a building. Never has the sight of two fluttering ends of a scarf caused my heart to skip a beat or two. And I will not look at a slinky the same way again.

suspiria1.jpg

suspiria2.jpg

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Those visuals are astounding. Now, as to the slinky ... dare I ask about it?

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I've seen quite a few films over the past few weeks which I'll have some comments on in a day or two. However, I've decided to go on a film binge of Kurosawa and Sergio Leone to get caught up on the so-called masters of the medium. What films of these two do you suggest? I know I've seen many of Leone's but again, i have no memory of i. I've seen Kurosawa's The Seven Samuari but do not remember it( same with the Magnificent Seven by Leone which is a retelling of The Seven Samurai ) and I've seen Ran also by by Kurosawa. Ran is an incredible film that has stayed with me ever since i first saw it last year.

What other's of these two do you recommend? I suppose I maybe end up watching them all but I don't mind some comments on them.

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