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Music you like...

343 posts in this topic

Posted

The concert finishes at 21:30 proper (British) time. I'd like to chat with people when I get back, so await me in the chat room, minions!

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Posted

Hadelich's playing was so spectacular that I ejaculated a little.

Thank you very much for the recommendation, :mike::yup:

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Posted

Hadelich's playing was so spectacular that I ejaculated a little.

Thank you very much for the recommendation, :mike::yup:

I'm glad you went, and I'm glad you enjoyed. Did you go backstage afterwards and introduce yourself?

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Posted

Apparently, the players had dressing rooms or something, dotted around the town hall, and I couldn't find where Hadelich had gone. :sadcheer:

Next time you speak with him, tell him his technique with his bow arm is brilliant. I could have closed my eyes and imagined the violin singing, so he's clearly trained himself very hard and very well to exert just the right amount of pressure with the bow.

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Posted

The Steel Guitar and its Imitators

Hawaiian music was popular in the 1930’s and the newly available electric guitar was not a typical “Spanish” guitar. It was a frying pan shaped guitar made of aluminum best played in the lap with a “steel” or slide. Hawaiian steel guitar was born.

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=FDvZkntgB28

Country musicians developed a liking for the steel guitar and soon it was appearing in country music as well.

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=Q49v4s3EE6w

In the 1950’s the steel guitar got out of the lap and up on legs of its own; these were known as console models. Console steels allowed for additional new “tricks” to be added to the steel guitar’s bag. More strings, knee operated levers, and pedals were added. The pedals change the pitch of various strings in order to form more complex chords and phrases. With this added sonic complexity the steel guitar found its way into jazz music too.

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=6Qii9zFuUd8

And blues:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KvAd3ivOq4

Steels are frequently coupled with a volume pedal or lever, which can give the steel an eerie Theremin-like sound.

Regular electric guitar players began to try and emulate the sounds of steel guitars, like Jimmy Bryant does here.

Another technique to do this is to pick the guitar while holding and slightly depressing the vibrato arm, ala Hank Marvin.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JretE6nHn4U[/url]

But the regular electric guitar didn’t have pedals, so the string bender was invented to give additional dimension to steel guitar mimicry. One of the first to be widely available was the Parsons/White string bender, debuted by Byrd’s guitarist Clarence White.

In the hands of a competent guitarist the string bender can create a very convincing steel guitar sound.

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Posted

Chad, how about this?

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Posted

Yeah, he's good. His sound is like Stanley Jordan meets Leo Kottke.

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Posted

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Posted (edited)

This is a song to listen to with the lights off, perhaps a candle or two lit, cigarette and glass of wine ready at hand. Her child-like voice, able to convey a deep longing, full of sadness, but not overpowering, resurrects the human voice as itself an instrument. Beautiful. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yh44C_Oooq0

Edited by DeadCanDance

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Posted (edited)

I have a proclivity for what has been called "apocalyptic folk;" these dark souls dancing as the world ends... Rome is, in my humble understanding, one of the most compelling, beautiful, dark, and relevant bands making music today:

Swear never to be gentle

To always be unkind

For love is hard to handle

For love will rob you blind

The burden of saintliness

The temptation to kneel

The mute fear of being caught

In vapours of sin

We who sing of the void

We who burn with love

So strangely plaintive

So strangely complete

In a few drunken hours

In a few hasty words

From our watering mouths

Lose all we came here for

If you were mine

I'd blush a little and die

Edited by DeadCanDance

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Posted

I just ran across this piece composed by the concert pianist, Adam Nieman:

The "Composition" page of his web site has a few other of his works. So far as I can tell, no recordings of his own compositions are commercially available, although he has quite a few CDs out with him playing works by other composers.

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Posted

I finally, after all these years, went to a movie theater in India. Although it was just a matinee showing and, hence, the audience was relatively small, there still were folks there who were loudly cheering for and jeering at the different characters. Indians are rather famous for audience participation -- along the lines of the crowds at The Rocky Horror Picture Show but without attending in costume.

Anyhow, it was a Hindi movie that was showing. That means I didn't understand a word (given my principled refusal to ever learn a word of Hindi) except for the occasional interjections of English, which is fairly common amongst many Hindi speakers. Then again, the fact that over 99% of the dialog was in Hindi did not really matter, because it was an action/romance flick, and even the comedic parts communicated despite the language. Besides, Bollywood movies are all about having a good time, and in Bollywood movies the most fun is had in the music and choreography.

The movie I saw was Kill/Dil, and here are some of its songs:

And there was also a song entitled "Happy Budday". Budday is actually birthday, and what is funny about that is - or so it seemed to me - that the title was Indians making fun of themselves inasmuch as English words are often seen to be spelled phonetically according to the way a particular locale pronounces English. For instance, in Munnar, I saw a big sign on the side of a building advertizing rooms and "doormatery" for rent, and our driver had on his itinerary for us a visit to the Dutch "simatary" in Cochin, where "simatary" is, of course, cemetery.

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Posted

The music is good, but that's not why I'm posting this here. Rather, it's the dancing, and although Fred Astaire is good, it's Eleanor Powell I really enjoy.

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Posted

Edmar Castaneda

 

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Posted

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