This site is supported by Nobility Studios.

Music you like...

343 posts in this topic

Posted

At the moment I'm having trouble believing that I'll ever fully enjoy another album again now that I own Jeff Buckley's 'Grace.' (That's a recommendation!) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Try out his father's albums. Happy/Sad is a classic. The singer of the Pretenders (80's) pop band was once a journalist for the NME (British music paper) and she said when she heard Tim Buckley's voice live for the first time she had an orgasm. Tim had a range of 5 octaves and died when he was 27, like father like son. If you're into to a mellow voice thing try out Nick Drake, he only wrote 3 albums in the early 70's before dying but again, all are amazing stuff. If you're looking forward in time you might like Radiohead's stuff that also uses similar Buckley techniques of angelic flights of voice, particular classic albums are OK Computer or Kid A, but if you're more into your straight rock n roll go for Bends, Fake Plastic Trees (a single from Bends) is a particular good example of how that voice-acoustic guitar-thing worked in the middle nineties. If you enjoy any of the examples offered let me know, so as one can move on and branch off into new and as yet undiscovered territories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Well I already have pretty much all the music you've mentioned, so we must have similar taste, other than Nick Drake, maybe I'll investigate! Not sure I entirely believe that Chrissie Hynde story, but I know what she means! I love The Bends, particularly the awesome 'tribal-esque' (the only way I can think to describe it) guitar solo in 'Nice Dream.' I think Radiohead are a great band, but I'll never love them as much as others, because I don't find as much soul in them. It really annoys me when people accuse Coldplay of being a 'watered-down' Radiohead, because they are anything but - for me they are actually the greater as I find their songs much simpler, yes, but purer and 'from the heart', not to be overly corny. I might guess if you like Radiohead that you like Pink Floyd as well? How about the Mars Volta? 'De-loused in the Comatorium' is a contender for most unbelievable album of the 2000s. One of their band members died fairly recently, actually, it does seem to be a tragic thing common to so many great artists...I was thinking of trying to get hold of the album released entitled 'Sketches (For 'My Sweetheart the Drunk')' that is the preliminary recordings Jeff Buckley layed down just before he was about to record his second album...man, the tragedy of it hits me every time I think about it! Have you ever heard it? (I haven't.) If you like Jeff Buckley do you like Rufus Wainwright? He's got the father/son thing in common...in the spirit of branching off into unknown territories lets have one random album recommendation, lets see...the 1967 album 'Forever Changes' by Love. An absolute classic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

not so much into coldplay or pink floyd, mars volta is ok, the love album is of course a 60s classic and mr rufus is enjoyable, in parts, I don't think I've heard the other stuff by jeff buckley but there is a lot of material around so maybe, I don't know. This white-male-rock-thing is fun from time to time. Thanks for the information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

This white-male-rock-thing is fun from time to time.

Heh. I do enjoy a considerable spectrum of other music....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Does anyone else have the new Tool record? After the first few plays i can't help but be disappointed. It rarely seems to reach the heights (and depth) of Lateralus and has way too much filler material - kind of a forced profoundity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Classical music is something I have recently dived into 2 years ago, and it has more depth than any other form of music, with all of the styles, composers, performers, periods, forms, techniques, emotions, etc.. it's a completely different beast than any other form of music I've encountered. I'm not going to attempt listing my favorite performers or composers, because I feel that I've barely scratched the surface.

Other than that, I like electronic music and progressive rock, for the most part. I realize 'electronic music' is really broad what with all of the subgenres it has, so to be more specific I mostly listen to what people call "IDM". I also like Juno Reactor, BT, Infected Mushroom and LTJ Bukem, but mainly IDM because I can only take so much of the typical electronic music song structure. As for progressive rock, I like ELP, Dream Theater, Aghora, Spiral Architect, LTE, Jordan Rudess, Steve Vai, Rush, Joe Satriani, and a few other classic/normal rock bands that people have actually heard of. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Last night I attended a concert in New Orleans at which Regina Carter (and the Regina Carter Quintet) played with the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra. My violin teacher had told me about Regina Carter quite a while ago; I did a quick listen to some of her music but was not especially moved at the time.

Well, last night was an entirely different experience.

Regina Carter, a jazz violinist, was magnificent -- as were the rest of the quintet members, and I am definitely going to be revisiting her recordings. She has a new CD which will be released on June 13, and I will most certainly be getting that one.

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

St. Elsewhere by Gnarls Barkley ( Danger Mouse and Ceelo Green )is a psychedelic, dark, yet laid back, pop, weirdness masterpiece. Pick this up. The album really is unclassifiable despite my little description there. It maybe a love or hate type thing ( an analysis I accept for only those far removed from the press the album is given since invariably people critique albums based on the amount of 'hype' they receive or what have you and let this hinder their enjoyment) but its fantastic to me. Incredible lyrics at times, and the music is layered madness..just wonderful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Classical music is something I have recently dived into 2 years ago, and it has more depth than any other form of music, with all of the styles, composers, performers, periods, forms, techniques, emotions, etc..

I disagree...I was a classical and instrumental music aficionado before anything else, but I now believe, by and large, if you can ever say such things with certainty, that the song is the greatest form of music, or rather, that the concept of song has the most potential for being the greatest. Obviously a song will not always be 'greater' than a piece of instrumental classical music; in fact, if I can make my point clear, I think that the opposite is usually true, but that the song is the greater 'blueprint.' This is largely because a song comes at us from more directions and media than classical instrumental music; whereas the latter appeals to our perception only through sound, the former appeals via language, and therefore direct conceptual communication to our minds as well. I believe that if, in the future, it is possible to be communicated to musically through a sythesis of sound, words and concepts, visuals and even physical sensation, then we will have the scope for multimedia composers to create the most extraordinary expressive and communicative experience. Just imagine the notes of a compositional genius, the ideas of the greatest songwriter, the visuals of an inspirational filmmaker and an amazing sensual experience. You would literally be able to live music.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I liked Lateralus, too, but haven't heard the new Tool album. I think one review I read said it sounds more a Perfect Circle album than a Tool album.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Alfred writes;

Classical music is something I have recently dived into 2 years ago, and it has more depth than any other form of music, with all of the styles, composers, performers, periods, forms, techniques, emotions, etc..

I don't think this kind of statement should be taken seriously, for it reveals only one's personal prejudice but nothing essentially true. For example, to say that Bach or Mozart had a better technique at writing music than say Lennon or Marley is an prejudice, moreover, if one was to say that their usage of scales, tonal qualities and so on, was richer, than, say, many modern musicians not in the classical genre, then, again the statement is false.

Talking of 'style', as in the type of music language used, the classic classical music 'language' is rather basic, nay immature, an understanding of the major and minor scales was suffice to whip out a classical score for nearly 250 years. Not until the advent of Jazz, for example, did the musician branch into 'esoteric' octatonic modes, for example, which stem from Arabic influences. This 'development' has been continuing, with many modern 'eletronic' musicians now branching into scales and modes from a whole myriad of sources, many of which are not 'European' in origin.

It should also be noted that rhythm is a very important aspect of music, and that classical music is almost child-like in its usage of rhythm, rarely branching out from standard 2, 4, or 8 time, and never making this rhythm a prominant part of its 'sound'. Curiously, on this point, I have often noted that those influenced by heavy metal or rock music in their youth have gone into clasical music in their later life thinking this is somehow a 'development', until, that is, one notes that Bach or Vivaldi's progressions and scales used, for example, are exactly those of our favourite permed hair, spandex adoring heavy metallers!

Broken Arrow writes;

the song is the greatest form of music, or rather, that the concept of song has the most potential for being the greatest

OK, before this can be addressed, what is this 'concept' of song? Personally, how is one going to differentiate 'song-wise' between say; 'All You Need is Love', 'Fur Elisa', or some opus concerto by Mozart, Nine Inch Nails, Marvin Gaye or Einsturzende Neubauten, for example?

Nevertheless, if I understand you correctly a song is that with lyrics and that with not lyrics is not a song. I fathom this from the quote; "Obviously a song will not always be 'greater' than a piece of instrumental classical music...I think that the opposite is usually true, but that the song is the greater 'blueprint.'

But this is not obvious, what has a song got to do with lyrics? Nay, what has music got to do with lyrics? And why is a song, generally speaking, going to be worse than a classical instrumental? Is Mozart's Requiem a collection of songs or classical music and why? And what exactly is this 'blueprint' other than the rather vague term, 'a direct conceptual communication'?

Again, you write "a song comes at us from more directions and media than classical instrumental music; whereas the latter appeals to our perception only through sound, the former appeals via language,".

Now, how does that work? When I put on songs (or are they 'classical' instrumentals') by, say, Brian Eno or Boards of Canada what 'language' are they coming to me at, other than the 'language' of music? They're not generally using 'verbal language' but its extrmemly difficult to say their songs are limited for this very reason, as if Madonna, or the Spice Girls had the upper hand because they spouted a loud of words down a microphone.

You talk of media and the live experience of perceiving a musician live who utilises all apects of 'multimedia', as if this might be a great idea for the future. If this is so, then this is being done, and as been done since the advent of 'visuals', why not get yourself a ticket to Glastonbury or some big Rave for a weekend in June and watch what happens, the experiences are mindblowing where many an individual does live 'live music' alive.

PS, there is only music, and it comes in two forms crap and good. I'm not going to enter into any philosophical debate about what exactly is 'good' music because the question itself doesn't make sense. Philosophical debate is essentially about words, but there are many things inexpressable in words and music is one of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Qualia, you don't need to type "Alfred writes" before the post. With BBCode you can simply type ="Alfred". Like this, minus spaces [ quote="Alfred" ]text[ /quote ]

It should also be noted that rhythm is a very important aspect of music, and that classical music is almost child-like in its usage of rhythm, rarely branching out from standard 2, 4, or 8 time, and never making this rhythm a prominant part of its 'sound'.

Uh.. maybe the Baroque or Classical periods but even before Jazz there were many pieces with ridiculous time signatures. Have you listened to many impressionist/modern/postmodern works? And as far as time signatures and rhythm go, electronic music is unmatched that area. Have you heard of "new complexity" artists? I haven't heard any artist in particular, but I've heard about it, and it seems like something you'd enjoy... from what I've heard it's basically classical music taking full advantage of electronic music.

Talking of 'style', as in the type of music language used, the classic classical music 'language' is rather basic, nay immature, an understanding of the major and minor scales was suffice to whip out a classical score for nearly 250 years.

I was talking mainly about tone color/timbre and song forms... but I would hardly call the language immature. :?

I have often noted that those influenced by heavy metal or rock music in their youth have gone into clasical music in their later life thinking this is somehow a 'development', until, that is, one notes that Bach or Vivaldi's progressions and scales used, for example, are exactly those of our favourite permed hair, spandex adoring heavy metallers!

Well, certain progressive rock bands borrowed heavily from the traditional forms classical music, e.g. ELP so that's understandable. If you think rhythm is really important, maybe you'd like Spiral Architect. However, composers like Sorabji trump Spiral Architect in rhythm, definitely. Take a listen to something like Sorabji's "Pastiche on Chopin's Op.64 (Minute Waltz)" if you value rhythm over everything else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I picked up Gnarls Barkley's St. Elsewhere yesterday and I love it. I was going to rave about it here but I see mosaic already has. You can listen to a few of their songs at their Myspace website.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

OK, before this can be addressed, what is this 'concept' of song?

The reason I used the slightly ridiculous-sounding terms 'concept' and 'blueprint' of song is that I was trying to make clear that I was not saying 'songs are always better than instrumental (ok; non-lyrical) music, full stop.)

I don't think I quite said that

a song, generally speaking, [is] going to be worse than a classical instrumental
, but I've tried to explain myself on this, and just keep deleting what I've written, so I give up.

However, the point is that I cautiously qualified what I was saying ('if you can ever say such things with certainty') for a reason; obviously any fool knows that we can't try and 'prove' any of these opinions. All I was trying to say was that, while I'm greatly moved by many pieces of 'classical' instrumental only music, in my subjective experience, I find that songs can move me even more. However, of course, this is not to say that a song will always be better, hence me trying to talk about the concept or idea of song; I believe that the perfect song would outstrip the perfect classical instrumental piece in its ability to move me. The reason for this, I conjecture, is that it is communicating both to the musician and note-lover in me, and to the romantic who is moved by sentiments. Thus, I further wonder whether this means that there is potential for even higher greatness in a form of music that combines one or even several more communicative media.

An example of what I mean by the heightened effect of combining notes and sentiments; take The Beatles' song 'In My Life', at the climax of the chorus; a sudden minor IV chord, always a lovely and heart-tugging turnaround in a piece, but coupled with the words 'In my life, I'll love you more,' makes the moment a particularly moving one, and brings an extra dimension of meaning, whereas alone it would have 'just' been a sweet melody.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

For any reggae lovers, Jah Mason- Never Give Up is an amazing album. Incredible lyrics you won't understand but the production is top notch and his alternating singing/deejay style is great to hear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I would like to recommend the CDs by Ghazal (more specifically the joint efforts of Kayhan Kalhor and Shujaat Husain Khan which also include other artists on tabla, other percussion, etc.). The music is generally describable as a bridge between or a fusion of classical Indian and Persian.

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

You know, we can all describe the music,

But why not let people listen to it instead?

Above are four tracks by UK band 'Hell is for Heroes' including

You Drove Me To It - First single after the 'Sick/Happy' demo tape

This song seems to be about suicide; it is not a literal suicide, but a falling down from the highest of places (for the musician - a deal with a top record label) after being driven to yearn for something less.

'Breathing immortality

I'm falling down 1000 feet'

Folded Paper Figures - B=side remastered for the 2nd album (the one above is the 2nd album version)

This song is about rebellion, though not necessarily victorious rebellion (which makes it refreshingly unique, IMO). It asks whether you stand by your beliefs, or let authority tell you what you believe.

'I need a will to live

something worth dying for'

Slow Song - A ballad that tears the walls apart on the 1st album

Not sure what this one's about: could be about wanting to get out of a relationship, or being in love with the wrong (sort of) woman.

'This space once filled heavy

with loss now lies empty'

New Song - A taster of the 3rd album, currently being written

I don't know the lyrics for this song yet, so can't say what it's about

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Moving on from hardcoreteen indie. Those that have enjoyed UK's Matthew Herbert's work and recognise that he has probably written "some of the warmest, most inviting and inventive 'dance' music of all time" might like to check out his new album Scale.

For the uninitiated, Herbert's superb work, Around the House, is considered today a classic deep-house album. And many critiques and music lovers talk about a "modern masterpiece" entitled Bodily Functions, in much the same light they talk about Portishead's 'Dummy' or Massive Attack's 'Blue Lines', that is, 'dance' albums that transformed the possibilities. Today Herbert has gone from being a some what leftfield or underground 'dance' artist into one of the most sort out producers and musicians in the early 21st century. Pitchfork has a well conducted interview with the fellow this month.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Am I to believe that no other Galileans listen to or even like music?

That would be me. Most music to me sounds like noise so I prefer my surroundings to be silent. I've tried all different kinds of music and the best I can say about any song is "tolerable".

Whoa... Not even elevator jazz? Or Jazz in general( eschewing some of the more experimental stuff which is nevertheless good but I could understand not liking) I would have a hard time believing anybogy could not listen to Miles Davis "All Blues" an album I just picked up for the first time several years ago( its nearly four decades old).

I don't know what elevator jazz is. And I really didn't like the sound of regular jazz. I've been trying to find the kind of music I like for some time now, I think the closest thing would be electronic music, but there's nothing that I consider actualy worth the money for the equipment and CD expense. And then I'm turned off by all the fame, celebrity, money, scenes and drugs involved with a lot of music. I get tired of hearing rappers talking about weed and country singers talking about drinking and pop bands talking about tortured romances: it just all makes me look with incredulity at the world. I guess it's hard for me to listen to a song without getting depressed about all the people out there listening to this song. And I've considered two explanations: either I'm in some way music-deaf or maybe I'm too sensitive to music, which makes me more critical than other people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Sufjan Steven's new album The Avalanche is excellent. If you are a Sufjan fan, you won't be disappointed. If you aren't a Sufjan fan, then :whack:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I second Rusty's recommendation but I do think before delving into this particular record first try out Sufjan Steven's Illinois. It's pretty much a modern masterpiece within its genre. He must also be the fellow with the longest song titles known to Occidental civilisation such as, 'The Black Hawk War, Or, How To Demolish An Entire Civilization And Still Feel Good About Yourself In The Morning, Or, We Apologize For The Inconvenience But You're Gonna Have To Leave Now, Or, 'I Have Fought The Big Knives And Will Continue To Fight.... My particular favourite (song that is) is: "Come On! Feel The Illinoise!: Part I: The World's Columbian Exposition/Part II: Carl Sandburg Visits Me In A Dream".

Parody: I have been cataloguing my record collection this week and its boardering on about 12,000 albums. (99.9% are original). If you let me know what kind of 'sound' you think you may like, let me know and I'll draw up a short track list for you to try out.

P.S. I know only a tiny handful of folk who are into their music per se, but for some reason or another everyone likes to tell you they're into music, but on inspection (of record collection and knowledge) its all a lie. At best they're into a particular 'sound' which usually stems from the UK or USA. If you don't like music, then its no big deal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

qualia, I think part of the reason I'm saying electronic music is because it's identifiable. A lot of the music that I like is electronic, but then there is a lot of electronic music I don't like (I loathe party music where the DJ or whoever likes to tell us how much he likes to party or calls out telling people to make noise). I also like some of what you may call instrumental music, though when I tune into the instrumental Sirius channels they're all horrible. What I'm refering to are, for example, the theme songs of the various Star Trek TV series (Deep Space Nine, Voyager, First Contact, Insurrection) and movies, the theme of the Simpsons: I don't know where else to find this "genre" of music. Not easy listening, not classical, but dramatic, sometimes distant and engaging. And when I say my preference, people for some reason assume I just like TV themes or soundtracks: absolutely not! Many TV themes are horrible, I just don't know where I can find this genre of music anyplace else, maybe there isn't even a name for it. And soundtracks are aweful for listening without the movie to go with it. Can anyone help me?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

qualia, oh, and what do you mean by people being into a sound but not music? I think I've stopped listening to music for the most part out of frustration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now