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FAO Nullifidian

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Posted

You did not know this? :noidea:

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Posted

I knew they had films, and clips of arias, but this is the first time I've managed to get a bunch of complete operas to come up when I search for one.

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Posted (edited)

Well, here's an audio recording I would definitely recommend: Beethoven's Fidelio with Jonas Kaufmann and Nina Stemme, conducted by Claudio Abbado.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BmT1RHCyQoc

Or if you prefer live action, a somewhat longer Fidelio with Peter Seiffert and Waltraud Meier, conducted by Zubin Mehta, with English subtitles.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Kv0vE05uxA

Edited by Nullifidian
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Posted

Here's Leonard Bernstein's Candide from the Barbican in a concert performance with a fantastic cast.

And here's Robert Carsen's reimagined version from the Théâtre du Châtelet:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaDGUrP1c28

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Posted

A studio recording of Verdi's early opera, I masnadieri, based on Schiller's The Robbers.

Schiller was a valuable source for Verdi, who also wrote operas based on Intrigue and Love (Luisa Miller), Don Carlos, and The Maid of Orleans (Giovanna d'Arco), and was arguably inspired by Schiller's dramas in many other operas not explicitly adapted from his works.

My favorite Verdi opera is Don Carlos, the title role of which is the tenor's Hamlet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCzuqZz0MWg

And lastly, because I know you liked the play Mary Stuart, here's Donizetti's brilliant Maria Stuarda. He also wrote two other equally great operas on Tudor-era queens: Anna Bolena (Anne Boleyn) and Roberto Devereaux (about Queen Elizabeth I and the Earl of Essex).

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Posted

Here's another opera you should definitely see.

Act 1, sc. 1 of Nixon in China by John Adams.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MWbcZ75A90

Adams has written a series of operas based on historical figures and events, including this one, The Death of Klinghoffer (the hijacking of the Achille Lauro) and Doctor Atomic (J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Manhattan Project).

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Posted

Tchaikovsky's Pikovaya Dama at Vienna:

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Posted (edited)

Adding a different Nixon in China video because the first was taken down.

If you want to skip Walter Cronkite's introduction, the opera itself begins at about 4:15.

Edited by Nullifidian

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Posted

A couple early Baroque operas from Claudio Monteverdi. The first is L'incorinazione di Poppea (The Coronation of Poppea) and the other is Il ritorno d'Ulisse in patria (The Return of Ulysses to His Homeland). Like the Classical authors on whom they were modeling their works—opera was originally an attempt to revive the performance practices of Greek theatre—they usually dealt with mythological subjects or subjects from Greek and Roman history. However, even at this early stage there were comic operas being written featuring contemporary and lower class people. Monteverdi himself started composing one (La finta pazza LicoriThe Feigned Madwoman Licori), but he abandoned the project and any sketches he may have made have been lost.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijDi-2RADX0

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Posted (edited)

davidm asked me to make a list of suggestions for operas he should listen to this Saturday via the Operacast site.

I could recommend pretty much all operas on the list, but especially the following (all times are EST):

11:10 a.m.: Maria Stuarda by Gaetano Donizetti, LRT Klasika from Vilnius.

1:00 p.m. Peter Grimes by Benjamin Britten, Deutschlandradio Kultur from Berlin.

Falstaff by Giuseppe Verdi, Radio 4 Netherlands

2:00 p.m. Die Walküre by Richard Wagner, Radio Stephansdom from Vienna

Macbeth by Giuseppe Verdi, Radio Tre from Rome

6:00 p.m. La bohème by Giacomo Puccini, KHPR from Honolulu or WDAV from Davidson, NC.

Edited by Nullifidian

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Posted

So where the heck is Peter Grimes? When I go to what seems to be the right page, and click any of the players, all I get are people endlessly babbling in German. :noidea:

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Posted (edited)

OK, now it's on. :)

Edited by davidm

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Posted

FFS, there has been more non-stop jabber in German than there has been opera so far. :doh: Since I don't know what they're saying, I must assume that they are discussing taking over the world. :heh:

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Posted

Davidm asked me if any other modern composers had written works on contemporary themes and settings, so I gave him a very partial list just off the top of my head. Aside from the John Adams operas I mentioned earlier, I also named X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X by Anthony Davis, Harvey Milk by Stewart Wallace, Bluthaus by Georg Friedrich Haas (inspired by the Natascha Kampusch case), Kniefall in Warschau by Gerhard Rosenfeld (about the political career of Willy Brandt), and Thomas Adès's Powder Her Face (about the sex scandal surrounding Margaret, the Duchess of Argyll).

I didn't mention, but I should, two operas by Mark-Anthony Turnage: Greek (based on the play by Stephen Berkoff, which relocates the events of Oedipus the King to the East End in Thatcher's Britain) and his most recent opera Anna Nicole.

I also recommended Hans Werner Henze's The Bassarids, an adaptation of Euripides' The Bacchae, not because it was modern in its setting, but just because it's awesome. :D But Henze's breakthrough opera was Boulevard Solitude, which took the Abbé Prévost's novel Manon Lescaut (which had been turned into operas by Massenet, Puccini, and Auber, and into a ballet by Jean-Louis Aumer) and updated its events to the 1950s in Paris, when the opera was premiered.

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Posted

copy paste from chat


  • The link's just the same as the last time I put in the opera thread.



  • It's always

  • photo-thumb-8.gif?_r=0davidm
    Oh, ok.
    :yo:
  • photo-thumb-190.gif?_r=0Nullifidian
    Actually, there's lots of good stuff on tomorrow.



  • Meyerbeer's
    L'


  • 23:10

  • photo-thumb-190.gif?_r=0Nullifidian
    L'africaine
    , Glinka's
    Ivan Susanin
    (
    A Life for the Tsar
    ), Verdi's
    La Traviata
    , etc.



  • Tchaikovsky's
    Eugene Onegin
    .



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Posted

  • photo-thumb-8.gif?_r=0davidm
    I am copy pasting this into thrad.
    :brow:


  • Done.
    :)
  • photo-thumb-190.gif?_r=0Nullifidian
    They're also doing a Stravinsky/Schoenberg double bill. Not opera, but a cantata from Stravinsky and a song cycle with soloists and orchestra by Schoenberg (his late Romantic classic
    Gurrelieder
    ).

  • photo-thumb-8.gif?_r=0davidm
    Are you going to be listening in to anything in particular/


  • 23:15

  • photo-thumb-190.gif?_r=0Nullifidian
    I'm leaning toward either the Meyerbeer or Glinka. I know the others very well (with the exception of Stravinsky's
    Cantata
    , but I bet I can find that on Youtube).



  • Since it's a German station, their listing is "Giacomo Meyerbeer 'Vasco de Gama' (Die Afrikanerin)".



  • But the usual title is the French one Meyerbeer gave it.

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Posted

For reference, from chat:


  • 'm just looking over the operas for tomorrow. Not a lot of selection. Your main choices are Handel, Wagner, and Verdi.






  • Did you mention you were interested in Verdi's Macbeth? If you are, it's playing on the Czech radio station at 2 p.m. your time.



  • And Boris Godunov is always good (Bartok Radio, Hungary at 2 p.m.).

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Posted

See how long it takes Null to list everything wrong with this review:

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/churchofthemasses/2013/01/twisted-oscar-amour/

BTW, before you click, the guy argues that Les Mis was more deserving of an Oscar than Amour, because it was more expensive, and had more big-name actors in it. That's the level of idiocy you'll be working with. :yup:

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Posted

For :davidm1: :

I strongly recommend A Midsummer Night's Dream by Benjamin Britten this upcoming Tuesday (15th) at 7:30 p.m. and The Nose by Dmitri Shostakovich at the same time on the 22nd.

For next month, I recommend Rigoletto by Giuseppe Verdi on the 11th at 8:00 p.m. and the 18th at 7:30 p.m., plus Die Frau ohne Schatten by Richard Strauss on the 12th at 7:00 p.m. or the 26th at 7:30 p.m. They're also giving one performance of Der Rosenkavalier by R. Strauss on the 25th at 7:00 p.m., but there are also a couple December performances on your two free days. If you want to read a retelling of Der Rosenkavalier, one is included in Anthony Burgess' anthology, The Devil's Mode Stories.

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Posted

About an hour until The Nose. :heh:

:nose:

No Nose smilie. Who nose why? :noidea:

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Posted

:doh:

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Posted (edited)

:heh:

:clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: for Nose. Comments later. Stunning visuals, clearly inspired by Russian suprematism. At least one entire scene seems to have been invented out of whole cloth, though, which I didn't particularly care for. The scene itself was fine, it's just that I don't think anyone should tamper with the original text, which is so gem-like perfect.

Edited by davidm

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Posted (edited)

The Metropolitan Opera's weekly radio season is about to begin with a performance of Rigoletto by Giuseppe Verdi at 12:30 EST (1730 GMT).

As always, you can catch the productions at Operacast.com or stream them live via the Met's own website.

And this month, my opera recommendations for :davidm1: are as follows:

Falstaff by Giuseppe Verdi on December 9th and December 30, both at 7:30.

Der Rosenkavalier by Richard Strauss on December 10th at 7:00.

Tosca by Giacomo Puccini on December 17th at 8:00 and December 23rd at 7:30.

Edited by Nullifidian

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